More information coming soon. This is intended to be an in-person event, pending the Covid-19 situation.

Monday, March 21

9:45 a.m.
Keynote address

10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Regional Cooperation: Key to Shared Prosperity and Security
The Eastern Mediterranean is characterized by fresh water scarcity, concentration of economic activities in coastal areas and reliance on climate-sensitive agriculture. In short, it is a climate change hotspot. For example, four countries are considered water poor: Egypt, Israel, Syria and Libya with projections forecast to increase from around 180 million people today to over 250 million over the next 15 years. Innovation in the conversion of waste water is another classic example of how these countries must work together to realize the basic needs of growing populations. While it is often overlooked in the discussions on hydrocarbons and renewables, access to fresh water is as vital to the security and prosperity of the region as ample supplies of energy.

11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Maritime Challenges in the Eastern Mediterranean – Towards Resolution or Conflict?
The dynamic itself among and between these countries needs to change from historical excuses for why something will not work to practical solutions that address the here, now and expectations for the next twenty years. How to focus the conversation about what is in the realm of the probable, instead of the impossible is a critical first step.

2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Reducing Risk and Procuring Private-Sector Investment
The Mediterranean region is ripe for the development of platform wind, conversion of gas to hydrogen and blue ammonia, and other renewables that will substantially lower the carbon footprint in years to come, as well as enhance energy self-sufficiency. However, in deciding where to build such projects, the region will face the same controversies as it does now with hydrocarbons. Convincing industry to partner with the region will first require maintaining a stable and secure environment for their investment. How can the region’s actors partner together to equitably resolve lingering disagreements and reducing regional risk and volatility?

4:15 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.
Implementing Green Technologies at Scale in the Mediterranean: Future Prospects
Hydrokinetic marine energy resources, as well as tidal and wave technology, are particularly well poised to address the Mediterranean’s future power needs. With applications varying from power sector, heavy industry, and hydrogen production, to removing carbon dioxide from the air through direct carbon capture, reuse and geologic storage, these technologies can reduce greenhouse gas emissions that renewable technologies and carbon offsets alone cannot address. This panel will examine the prospects for developing and deploying such technologies at scale. Special attention will be paid to how these cutting-edge technologies impact the local marine environment.

Tuesday, March 22

9:45 a.m.
Keynote address

10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Energy Security and the Green Transition: Establishing Self-Reliance
The precipitous drop in renewable energy prices over the course of 2020 made that industry more financially attractive. However, as the fossil fuel surplus from the height of the pandemic begins to disappear and energy prices return to pre-Covid-19 levels, Russia and members of the OPEC+ coalition have pushed for increased production. How can policymakers and industry executives invest in the Mediterranean implement renewable energy sources while at the same time ensure against dependence on Russia and neighboring petrol states? How can the vast natural gas discoveries be used as a tool for the region to choose its own destiny as it adds renewable energy to the mix?

11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Expanding Access to Electricity and Power to Underserved Populations
Today almost 16% of the world’s population, close to 1.2 billion people, still do not have access to electricity. In places such as the Mediterranean where there is an abundance of energy, there is simply no reasonable explanation for not proceeding along a path designed to benefit all segments of the population. This panel will explore innovative yet practical policies for the region to ensure that incoming regional infrastructure expands access to modern energy services to underserved populations, including women and small children often the most disproportionately affected segments of the population, especially in post-conflict communities. How can energy become the means of collective sustainable development?

2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Innovative Regulatory Frameworks for Industry and Development
Special economic zones have been proven as a successful model to boost domestic industry and human capital development. Innovative legal instruments and policymaking can generate growth for small and medium enterprises and attract new investment both nationally and internationally. Can new partnerships between academic institutions, private industry and public entities chart the way ahead? Are new legal and policy mechanisms a part of how this can be applied to the Mediterranean basin and if so, how can they best be developed?

4:15 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Shifting the Narrative in the Mediterranean: Round Table Discussion